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SHOSTAKOVICH, D.: Symphonies, Vol. 9 - Symphony No. 4 (Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, Petrenko)

Composer(s):Shostakovich, Dmitry
Artist(s) Petrenko, Vasily, Conductor • Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra
Period(s) 20th Century
Genre Classical Music
Category Orchestral
Catalogue 8.573188
Label Naxos
Quality   320kbps
Album Price
 
FLAC
USD 7.99
 

 
MP3
USD 6.99
 

 


Completed in 1936 but withdrawn during rehearsal and not performed until 1961, the searing Fourth Symphony finds Shostakovich stretching his musical idiom to the limit in the search for a personal means of expression at a time of undoubted personal and professional crisis. The opening movement, a complex and unpredictable take on sonata form that teems with a dazzling profusion of varied motifs, is followed by a short, eerie central movement. The finale opens with a funeral march leading to a climax of seismic physical force that gives way to a bleak and harrowing minor key coda. The Symphony has since become one of the most highly regarded of the composer’s large-scale works.


   




Review By Philip Clark,Sinfini Music,October 2013

Shostakovich’s opening – super-high woodwinds, strings and xylophone – in Petrenko’s hands puts one in mind of an Edvard Munch scream; stylised expressionism, chilling to the marrow. And everything about this performance, from its marshalled rhythms and breathless, nervy pace to its lurid, nothing-behind-the-eyes orchestral colours, feels like hyped-up realism, which, of course, also means its slant on reality is artificial and twisted – a powerful metaphor indeed for trying to live a true artist’s life under the cosh of Stalin. © 2013 Sinfini Music Read complete review



Review By Philip Clark,Sinfini Music,October 2013

Shostakovich’s opening – super-high woodwinds, strings and xylophone – in Petrenko’s hands puts one in mind of an Edvard Munch scream; stylised expressionism, chilling to the marrow. And everything about this performance, from its marshalled rhythms and breathless, nervy pace to its lurid, nothing-behind-the-eyes orchestral colours, feels like hyped-up realism, which, of course, also means its slant on reality is artificial and twisted – a powerful metaphor indeed for trying to live a true artist’s life under the cosh of Stalin. © 2013 Sinfini Music Read complete review



Review By Philip Clark,Sinfini Music,October 2013

Shostakovich’s opening – super-high woodwinds, strings and xylophone – in Petrenko’s hands puts one in mind of an Edvard Munch scream; stylised expressionism, chilling to the marrow. And everything about this performance, from its marshalled rhythms and breathless, nervy pace to its lurid, nothing-behind-the-eyes orchestral colours, feels like hyped-up realism, which, of course, also means its slant on reality is artificial and twisted – a powerful metaphor indeed for trying to live a true artist’s life under the cosh of Stalin. © 2013 Sinfini Music Read complete review



Review By Philip Clark,Sinfini Music,October 2013

Shostakovich’s opening – super-high woodwinds, strings and xylophone – in Petrenko’s hands puts one in mind of an Edvard Munch scream; stylised expressionism, chilling to the marrow. And everything about this performance, from its marshalled rhythms and breathless, nervy pace to its lurid, nothing-behind-the-eyes orchestral colours, feels like hyped-up realism, which, of course, also means its slant on reality is artificial and twisted – a powerful metaphor indeed for trying to live a true artist’s life under the cosh of Stalin. © 2013 Sinfini Music Read complete review



Review By Philip Clark,Sinfini Music,October 2013

Shostakovich’s opening – super-high woodwinds, strings and xylophone – in Petrenko’s hands puts one in mind of an Edvard Munch scream; stylised expressionism, chilling to the marrow. And everything about this performance, from its marshalled rhythms and breathless, nervy pace to its lurid, nothing-behind-the-eyes orchestral colours, feels like hyped-up realism, which, of course, also means its slant on reality is artificial and twisted – a powerful metaphor indeed for trying to live a true artist’s life under the cosh of Stalin. © 2013 Sinfini Music Read complete review








 

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