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BARTOK, B.: Concerto for Orchestra / Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta (Baltimore Symphony, Alsop)

Composer(s):Bartok, Bela
Artist(s) Alsop, Marin, Conductor • Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
Period(s) 20th Century
Genre Classical Music
Category ConcertosOrchestral
Catalogue 8.572486
Label Naxos
Quality   320kbps
Album Price
 
FLAC
USD 7.99
 

 
MP3
USD 6.99
 

 


Béla Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra, one of his greatest works, was written in the United States after the composer was forced to flee Hungary during World War II. It is not only a brilliant display vehicle for each instrumental section but a work of considerable structural ingenuity that unites classical forms and sonorities with the pungency of folk rhythms and harmonies. Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta explores darker moods through a score of marvellously poised symmetry. This release follows Marin Alsop’s ‘riveting’ (Gramophone) Baltimore Symphony recordings of Dvořák’s symphonies.


   




Review By Carlhåkan Larsén,Sydsvenskan.se,November 2012



Review By Carlhåkan Larsén,Sydsvenskan.se,November 2012



Review By Patrick Szersnovicz,Diapason,


8.572486_Diapason_fr.pdf


Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....


Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....

Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....

Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....

Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....

Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....

Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....

Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....

Review By Steve Arloff ,MusicWeb International,July 2012

I’ve said before that at one time the very name of Bartók would have caused me to believe I wouldn’t like the music in the same way that some people believe that there are certain foodstuffs that they won’t like though they’ve never tried them. If there are any people who feel that way then the Concerto for Orchestra is without a doubt the best way to conquer that feeling. It is the most wonderfully musical piece with exciting melodies, especially the folk-inspired third movement in which Bartók exploits his unique facility with using folk tunes which he introduced into so many of his works. If there are people who also believe that he was not a composer that could ‘let his hair down’ then the fourth movement should dispel

Once again with Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta we have another example of Bartók as a mould breaker—surely not even Vivaldi who wrote music for just about every conceivable instrument could have come up with that combination…Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is a marvellously atmospheric work with a whole gallery of interesting instruments being marshalled with percussion comprising side drum, snare drum, cymbals, tam-tam, bass drum, timpani and xylophone with the celesta, harp and piano ranged in the middle of two sets of strings. Within the four movements of roughly equal lengths there is wonderful writing that fully exploits the individual characteristics of the various sections used and the whole work is a thrilling and exhilarating listen. Once again this orchestra throws itself wholeheartedly into the performance giving full vent to the possibilities the composition allows for. I can imagine that it is extremely taxing for everyone concerned, especially the conductor who must be quite exhausted by its close as there is no let-up from start to finish.

I thoroughly enjoyed these highly energetic performances and am eager to explore other recordings Marin Alsop has made with this fine orchestra, including her highly acclaimed Dvořák cycle. © 2012 MusicWeb International Read complete review

more....

Review By Christophe Huss,ClassicsTodayFrance.com,July 2012

Ce CD fait très clairement partie des meilleurs accomplissements discographiques de Marin Alsop.

Il apparait toutefois comme un “CD Naxos recommandable” plutôt que comme une version marquante de la discographie qui, depuis 50 ans (Fricsay, Dorati et Reiner pour les deux; Solti et Leinsdorf pour le Concerto; Mravinski pour la Musique), engrange les réussites majeures—Ivan Fischer l’emportant parmi les versions de l’ère numérique.

more....


Review By Christophe Huss,ClassicsTodayFrance.com,July 2012

Ce CD fait très clairement partie des meilleurs accomplissements discographiques de Marin Alsop.

Il apparait toutefois comme un “CD Naxos recommandable” plutôt que comme une version marquante de la discographie qui, depuis 50 ans (Fricsay, Dorati et Reiner pour les deux; Solti et Leinsdorf pour le Concerto; Mravinski pour la Musique), engrange les réussites majeures—Ivan Fischer l’emportant parmi les versions de l’ère numérique.

more....


Review By Infodad.com,June 2012

…a very worthy recording…The very start of Concerto for Orchestra is particularly impressive here, building highly effectively from the depths of the orchestra to a main section…certainly well-played. Indeed, the orchestra’s playing is a major plus of this disc: the ensemble is sure in sound, very well balanced and as virtuosic as the music needs it to be. Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta is also very well played, paced rather slowly, ebbing and flowing through its sequence of mostly darker moods in a well-balanced reading that…has lovely flow in the slower ones. © 2012 Infodad.com Read complete review



Review By new-classics.co.uk,May 2012

Bartok called the piece a concerto rather than a symphony because of the way each section section of instruments is invited to reveal its virtousic skills. Each instrumental section is brilliantly displayed in a work of considerable structural ingenuity that unites classical forms and sonirities with the pungency of folk rhythms and harmonies. Also included here is Bartok’s Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta, which explore darker moods through a score of marvellously poised symmetry. The acclaimed Martin Alsop…conducts the impressive Baltimore Symphony Orchestra… © 2012 new-classics.co.uk



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