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BACH, J.C.F.: Symphonies, W. I/6, 10, 20 (Leipzig Chamber Orchestra, Schuldt-Jensen)

Composer(s):Bach, Johann Christoph Friedrich
Artist(s) Schuldt-Jensen, Morten, Conductor • Leipzig Chamber Orchestra
Period(s) Classical (1750-1830)
Genre Classical Music
Category Orchestral
Catalogue 8.572217
Label Naxos
Quality   320kbps
 
 
Download and Stream
8.572217
 


Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach, the third of the sons of Johann Sebastian Bach to achieve musical distinction, composed some twenty symphonies as well as concertos, chamber and instrumental music, and a number of vocal works. The three elegant and witty symphonies on this disc are delightful examples of the synthesis between mid-to-late 18th-century Italian and German musical styles which marks the transition from Baroque to Classical. The acclaimed Leipzig Chamber Orchestra has recorded Haydn’s The Seasons (8.557600–01), Mozart’s Davide penitente (8.570231) and Requiem () as well as a series of Schubert’s Masses (8.572114, 8.570381, 8.572279 & 8.570764).

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Review By John W Barker,American Record Guide,July 2011

Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732–95) was the third of the musical “sons of Bach” in order of birth, but he has been overshadowed by his older brothers Wilhelm Friedemann and Carl Philipp Emmanuel, and his younger sibling, Johann Christian. The neglect is perhaps understandable. JCF was the least individual of the lot in personality and the most subject to outside influences (even by his younger brother). He spent most of his career in a small and backwater court, at Buckeburg, subject to the whims of his princely employer—though he was able to work there with the distinguished poet and linguist Johann Gottfried Herder. And, if nothing else, JCF did produce a musical son of his own, Wilhelm Friedrich Ernst, the only composer grandson of old JS Bach,

As Hannsdieter Wohlfarth’s pioneering thematic catalog reveals, JCF was a prolific composer; and we have a good deal of his instrumental music, mainly in chamber forms. A total of 20 symphonies from his hand have been identified, though 12 have been lost and one survives only in a keyboard arrangement, leaving seven.

Back around 1974, Helmut Muller-Bruhl recorded all seven symphonies…The first four surviving works were recorded by Dennis Russell Davies with the St Luke’s Orchestra and issued by Musical Heritage Society both on its mail-order label…and on Musicmasters…Almost immediately thereafter, Burkhard Glaetzner’s recording of the last three survivors…appeared on Berlin…now reissued as the last disc in the 7-CD Sons-of-Bach set from Brilliant…

This new release offers the same three works as Glaetzner. All three call for an orchestra of strings with winds. The first two of them, part of a series composed roughly between 1765 and 1772, are in three movements and follow the pattern of Italian opera sinfonias, parallel to what his younger brother, Johann Christian, was writing—though No. 10 introduces innovative sonata-form in its first movement. The final work, No. 20, dates from the mid-1790s: it is in four movements, adding clarinets to the winds. It was influenced by the Viennese world of Haydn and Mozart.

Our composer’s style is light and tuneful, but lacking much imagination in either lyrical originality or craftsmanship. Schuldt-Jensen’s Leipzig group gives these works their first appearance in full period-instrument performances—precisely pointed and more crisp than Glaetzner’s, for example. One wonders if Naxos will support another disc to round out the remaining four works of this legacy.

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Review By John W Barker,American Record Guide,July 2011

Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732–95) was the third of the musical “sons of Bach” in order of birth, but he has been overshadowed by his older brothers Wilhelm Friedemann and Carl Philipp Emmanuel, and his younger sibling, Johann Christian. The neglect is perhaps understandable. JCF was the least individual of the lot in personality and the most subject to outside influences (even by his younger brother). He spent most of his career in a small and backwater court, at Buckeburg, subject to the whims of his princely employer—though he was able to work there with the distinguished poet and linguist Johann Gottfried Herder. And, if nothing else, JCF did produce a musical son of his own, Wilhelm Friedrich Ernst, the only composer grandson of old JS Bach,

As Hannsdieter Wohlfarth’s pioneering thematic catalog reveals, JCF was a prolific composer; and we have a good deal of his instrumental music, mainly in chamber forms. A total of 20 symphonies from his hand have been identified, though 12 have been lost and one survives only in a keyboard arrangement, leaving seven.

Back around 1974, Helmut Muller-Bruhl recorded all seven symphonies…The first four surviving works were recorded by Dennis Russell Davies with the St Luke’s Orchestra and issued by Musical Heritage Society both on its mail-order label…and on Musicmasters…Almost immediately thereafter, Burkhard Glaetzner’s recording of the last three survivors…appeared on Berlin…now reissued as the last disc in the 7-CD Sons-of-Bach set from Brilliant…

This new release offers the same three works as Glaetzner. All three call for an orchestra of strings with winds. The first two of them, part of a series composed roughly between 1765 and 1772, are in three movements and follow the pattern of Italian opera sinfonias, parallel to what his younger brother, Johann Christian, was writing—though No. 10 introduces innovative sonata-form in its first movement. The final work, No. 20, dates from the mid-1790s: it is in four movements, adding clarinets to the winds. It was influenced by the Viennese world of Haydn and Mozart.

Our composer’s style is light and tuneful, but lacking much imagination in either lyrical originality or craftsmanship. Schuldt-Jensen’s Leipzig group gives these works their first appearance in full period-instrument performances—precisely pointed and more crisp than Glaetzner’s, for example. One wonders if Naxos will support another disc to round out the remaining four works of this legacy.

more....

Review By John W Barker,American Record Guide,July 2011

Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732–95) was the third of the musical “sons of Bach” in order of birth, but he has been overshadowed by his older brothers Wilhelm Friedemann and Carl Philipp Emmanuel, and his younger sibling, Johann Christian. The neglect is perhaps understandable. JCF was the least individual of the lot in personality and the most subject to outside influences (even by his younger brother). He spent most of his career in a small and backwater court, at Buckeburg, subject to the whims of his princely employer—though he was able to work there with the distinguished poet and linguist Johann Gottfried Herder. And, if nothing else, JCF did produce a musical son of his own, Wilhelm Friedrich Ernst, the only composer grandson of old JS Bach,

As Hannsdieter Wohlfarth’s pioneering thematic catalog reveals, JCF was a prolific composer; and we have a good deal of his instrumental music, mainly in chamber forms. A total of 20 symphonies from his hand have been identified, though 12 have been lost and one survives only in a keyboard arrangement, leaving seven.

Back around 1974, Helmut Muller-Bruhl recorded all seven symphonies…The first four surviving works were recorded by Dennis Russell Davies with the St Luke’s Orchestra and issued by Musical Heritage Society both on its mail-order label…and on Musicmasters…Almost immediately thereafter, Burkhard Glaetzner’s recording of the last three survivors…appeared on Berlin…now reissued as the last disc in the 7-CD Sons-of-Bach set from Brilliant…

This new release offers the same three works as Glaetzner. All three call for an orchestra of strings with winds. The first two of them, part of a series composed roughly between 1765 and 1772, are in three movements and follow the pattern of Italian opera sinfonias, parallel to what his younger brother, Johann Christian, was writing—though No. 10 introduces innovative sonata-form in its first movement. The final work, No. 20, dates from the mid-1790s: it is in four movements, adding clarinets to the winds. It was influenced by the Viennese world of Haydn and Mozart.

Our composer’s style is light and tuneful, but lacking much imagination in either lyrical originality or craftsmanship. Schuldt-Jensen’s Leipzig group gives these works their first appearance in full period-instrument performances—precisely pointed and more crisp than Glaetzner’s, for example. One wonders if Naxos will support another disc to round out the remaining four works of this legacy.

more....






 

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