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PENDERECKI, K.: Credo / Cantata in honorem Almae Matris Universitatis Iagellonicae sescentos abhinc annos fundatae (Warsaw Philharmonic, Wit)

Composer(s):Penderecki, Krzysztof
Artist(s)
Period(s) Contemporary
Genre Classical Music
Category Choral - SacredChoral - Secular
Catalogue 8.572032
Label Naxos
Quality   320kbps
Album Price
 
MP3
USD 6.99
 

 


Described by USA Today as ‘one of Penderecki’s most colorful and extroverted [pieces]’, the Credo is a sweeping, lavishly scored and highly Romantic setting of the Catholic profession of faith. Its use of traditional tonality alongside passages of choral speech, ringing brass and exotic percussive effects marks it as a potent Neo-romantic masterpiece. Composed more than 30 years earlier, the short avant garde Cantata recalls the sound world of Ligeti and celebrates the survival, over 600 years, of the University near Kraków. ‘Antoni Wit and his Polish forces are incomparable in this repertoire’ (Penderecki’s Utrenja, Naxos 8.572031 / David Hurwitz,

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Review By Josep Pascual,Scherzo,July 2011


8.572032_Scherzo_072011_sp.pdf


Review By Marsimo Viazzo,Musica,April 2011

I1 Credo di Pen derecki è stato completato nel 1998 in risposta a una comissione dell’ Oregon Bach Festival, che in realtà chiedeva a1 musicista di comporre una Vera e propria Messa. Ma Penderecki alle prese con il « cuore » della liturgia decide di arrestarsi li, enfatinando poderosamente il symbolum nicenum in un brano autonomo e autosufficiente. 11 lavoro, segmentato in cinque sezioni e con otto interpolazioni al testo liturgico, qui declinato nella sua completezza. risulta di irn~attod rammatico ragiardevole e aipartiene alla fase neo-romantica che nelle ultime auattro decadi ha stabilito un’inversione di tendenza nella produzione del compositore polacco, all’inizio della sua attiviti affascinato

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Review By Classica,March 2011


8.572032_Classica_032011_FR.pdf


Review By Bertrand Dermoncourt,Classica,February 2011


8.572032_Classica_Repertoire_022011_fr.pdf


Review By Bob Briggs ,MusicWeb International,November 2010

Krzysztof Penderecki has come a long way since he hit the musical scene in the early 1960s with his Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima and the St Luke Passion. After the 1st Symphony (1973) his style started to change and the Violin Concerto (1976), and 2nd Cello Concerto (1982), saw a generous new vein of late romantic lyricism enter his work. That’s not to say that he lost his “edge” as a contemporary composer, but he seemed happy in a more relaxed, less angstvoll style. However, more recent works, such as the Horn Concerto, subtitled Winterreise (2007/2008) and Symphony No.8, Lieder der Vergänglichkeit (2004/2005) seem to show him simply going through the motions of composition with

It is obvious that Penderecki’s career as a conductor influenced his own work—“The kind of music I was conducting influenced my own music very much. During this time [the 1970s] I began to have my Romantic ideas, partly because I was conducting Bruckner, Sibelius and Tchaikovsky.” But one has to wonder if this was a good thing. In an interview given in 2000, with Bruce Duffie, he said, “we pushed music so far in the sixties that even for myself, for me, I closed the door behind me, because there was no way to do anything more than I have done…I decided that there is no way that I can move on.” Certainly not everyone was happy with the change in musical direction. A comment from Bernard Holland, in the New York Times, concerning the American première of the 3rd Symphony, seems to be relevant to the Credo here under discussion—“One would admire more his economy of means, were the means being economized more interesting.”

Credo comes from the very end of the second period, if I may call it that, where the music, although of a more romantic inclination, still has some disturbing undercurrents. But it worries me for although there is some bold choral writing, there is also some very banal orchestral material. Certainly the best music here is for the chorus and when the orchestra is in an accompanying role the writing is interesting but Penderecki seems unable to sustain the level of inspiration throughout the whole work. Credo is a relatively short work, and that’s no bad thing, for there simply isn‘t the material to sustain a bigger structure, of the dimensions of one of the earlier choral and orchestral works. Here, Penderecki seems to have lived up to Holland’s comments regarding the 3rd Symphony, written not long before the Credo.

One would expect the Cantata in Honour of the Alma Mater Jagellonian University Founded Six Hundred Years Ago to be a pièce d’occasion but in fact what we have is a tough, uncompromising essay in the manner of Penderecki’s 1960s style, but toned down a little as befits such an obviously public work. I have tomore....

Review By Bob Briggs ,MusicWeb International,November 2010

Krzysztof Penderecki has come a long way since he hit the musical scene in the early 1960s with his Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima and the St Luke Passion. After the 1st Symphony (1973) his style started to change and the Violin Concerto (1976), and 2nd Cello Concerto (1982), saw a generous new vein of late romantic lyricism enter his work. That’s not to say that he lost his “edge” as a contemporary composer, but he seemed happy in a more relaxed, less angstvoll style. However, more recent works, such as the Horn Concerto, subtitled Winterreise (2007/2008) and Symphony No.8, Lieder der Vergänglichkeit (2004/2005) seem to show him simply going through the motions of composition with

It is obvious that Penderecki’s career as a conductor influenced his own work—“The kind of music I was conducting influenced my own music very much. During this time [the 1970s] I began to have my Romantic ideas, partly because I was conducting Bruckner, Sibelius and Tchaikovsky.” But one has to wonder if this was a good thing. In an interview given in 2000, with Bruce Duffie, he said, “we pushed music so far in the sixties that even for myself, for me, I closed the door behind me, because there was no way to do anything more than I have done…I decided that there is no way that I can move on.” Certainly not everyone was happy with the change in musical direction. A comment from Bernard Holland, in the New York Times, concerning the American première of the 3rd Symphony, seems to be relevant to the Credo here under discussion—“One would admire more his economy of means, were the means being economized more interesting.”

Credo comes from the very end of the second period, if I may call it that, where the music, although of a more romantic inclination, still has some disturbing undercurrents. But it worries me for although there is some bold choral writing, there is also some very banal orchestral material. Certainly the best music here is for the chorus and when the orchestra is in an accompanying role the writing is interesting but Penderecki seems unable to sustain the level of inspiration throughout the whole work. Credo is a relatively short work, and that’s no bad thing, for there simply isn‘t the material to sustain a bigger structure, of the dimensions of one of the earlier choral and orchestral works. Here, Penderecki seems to have lived up to Holland’s comments regarding the 3rd Symphony, written not long before the Credo.

One would expect the Cantata in Honour of the Alma Mater Jagellonian University Founded Six Hundred Years Ago to be a pièce d’occasion but in fact what we have is a tough, uncompromising essay in the manner of Penderecki’s 1960s style, but toned down a little as befits such an obviously public work. I have tomore....

Review By Joshua Meggitt,Cyclic Defrost,September 2010

Krzysztof Penderecki is a composer with two lives: one, the creator of radical, challenging, fiercely avant-garde orchestral works including the Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima (1961) and Fluorescences (1962); two, the composer of devotional religious music, frequently reduced choral settings, particularly prevalent after the Stabat Mater of 1966. The former music allied him with fellow Eastern European modernists Ligeti and Lutoslawski, appeared in the visionary films of Stanley Kubrick and David Lynch, and no doubt led to his recent interview in techno website Resident Advisor. Later works reject the overt political stance and explosive sound worlds in favour of tonal simplicity, no doubt leading to wider popular appeal but losing the excitement

Credo of 1998 explores a section of the liturgical Mass to investigate the composer’s own spiritual beliefs, developing a series of ideas over a number of distinct yet related sections. There is none of Arvo Part’s austerity; Credo works in bold, brash colours, big choral and orchestral gestures daubed on with vigour. The introduction is immediately gripping, massed voices loudly singing over droning organ and large blocks of symphonic sound. Elsewhere blasts of brass evoke particularly violent angels, slowing to the bucolic calm of the penultimate movement before concluding with hammered percussion and rousing chorus. The Cantata of 1964 finds Penderecki exploring the idiom with more open ears. Dedicated to the founding and survival of the Jagellonian University near Krakow, threatened with destruction by the Nazis, Penderecki here utilises a range of sonic means—glissandi, tone clusters, percussion salvos, silence—arranged in jagged contrast, to depict the School’s endurance. It’s a thrilling piece, the stand-out on this impressive snap-shot survey.

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