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GESUALDO, C.: Madrigals, Book 2 (Madrigali libro secondo, 1594) (Delitiae Musicae, Longhini)

Composer(s):Gesualdo, Carlo
Artist(s) Leoni, Carmen, clavichord • Longhini, Marco, Conductor • Delitiae Musicae, Ensemble
Period(s) Renaissance (1400-1600)
Genre Classical Music
Category Choral - SecularInstrumental • Vocal Ensemble
Catalogue 8.570549
Label Naxos
Quality   320kbps
Album Price
 
CD
USD 9.99
 

 
MP3
USD 6.99
 

 


Gesualdo’s Second Book of Madrigals, performed on this recording by male voices only, is an even more radical study of the themes explored in Volume 1 (8.570548), a continuation as it were of the same work. Like Book 1, it was published in 1594 in Ferrara during the preparations for Gesualdo’s second wedding, and demonstrates his ability to treat the poetic word as a source of musical ideas. The last two tracks present Gesualdo’s only two instrumental compositions. ‘Delitiæ Musicæ’s survey of Monteverdi’s madrigals for Naxos was an outstanding achievement, as good as any versions in the current CD catalogue.’ (The Guardian)


   



Delitiae Musicae's unconventional interpretations work perfectly for Gesualdo
Review By MW91388,February 2011

Delitiae Musicae are on contract with Naxos to record the complete madrigals of Carlo Gesualdo. This disc includes the Second Book of Madrigals, which was published in 1594, the same year as the First Book of Madrigals. But the last two tracks are a bonus: the only two known instrumental works by this Italian master. The instrumentation for these works is not known, but director Marco Longhini has made educated choices for the performances of these rare treasures.

The recording is clear, and the singers can be heard in different areas of your speakers, creating a spatial effect that is suitable for Gesualdo's bizarre composing style. All of the singers are male, ranging from bass to countertenor. Timing on the syllables is perfect, and the vocalists don't over enunciate. A more....



Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....
Review By J. F. Weber , Fanfare,May 2011

The first disc in this series held out promise of a more relaxed interpretation of the mannerist madrigals that Don Carlo Gesualdo created. This time a harpsichord is added in five of the 20 pieces. The composer’s two surviving instrumental works are bonus tracks, the familiar Canzon francese del Principe as a clavichord solo and the Gagliarda del Principe di Venosa with a gamba consort. Marco Longhini’s way with this dense music is remarkable, quite a contrast to the northern European approach, more relaxed in unfolding the word-settings. Longhini makes it clear that the first two books belong together, two volumes of madrigals composed together and published almost simultaneously. He points out that one of these madrigals has a text by Alfonso d’Avalos, the

This series promises to be rewarding. The next two discs have already been recorded and numbers assigned to them, no doubt to whet our appetites. This set can be judged without reference to the price advantage that it enjoys. Hence the strong recommendation to pick up Longhini’s series as fast as they appear.

more....


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