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RESPIGHI, O.: Concerto in modo misolidio / Fontane di Roma (Fountains of Rome) (Mustonen, Finnish Radio Symphony, Oramo)

Composer(s):Respighi, Ottorino
Artist(s) Oramo, Sakari, Conductor • Finnish Radio Symphony OrchestraMustonen, Olli, piano
Period(s) 20th Century
Genre Classical Music
Category ConcertosOrchestral
Catalogue ODE1165-2
Label Ondine
Quality   320kbps
Album Price
 
CD
USD 16.99
 

 
MP3
USD 9.99
 

 

   




Review By Jeremy Nicholas,Gramophone,December 2010

Finnish players favour clarity over warmth in Respighi’s sun-kissed Roman pictures

more....


Review By Jeremy Nicholas,Gramophone,December 2010

Finnish players favour clarity over warmth in Respighi’s sun-kissed Roman pictures

more....


Review By Jeremy Nicholas,Gramophone,December 2010

Finnish players favour clarity over warmth in Respighi’s sun-kissed Roman pictures

more....


Review By Jeremy Nicholas,Gramophone,December 2010

Finnish players favour clarity over warmth in Respighi’s sun-kissed Roman pictures

more....


Review By Jeremy Nicholas,Gramophone,December 2010

Finnish players favour clarity over warmth in Respighi’s sun-kissed Roman pictures

more....


Review By Jeremy Nicholas,Gramophone,December 2010

Finnish players favour clarity over warmth in Respighi’s sun-kissed Roman pictures

more....


Review By Rob Barnett ,MusicWeb International,October 2010

Respighi’s fame now rests on his three Roman poems and the Rossini based suites. He in fact wrote concertos as well as a whole sequence of operas seemingly in aspiring competition with Puccini. The Concerto Gregoriano is his violin concerto. In it the soloist rather than being protagonist serves as hortator and cantor. It is a most lovely work whose melodies follow the undulating contours of Gregorian plainchant. Adversarial or dramatic it is not. For this aspect we need to look at the contrasting delights of the Concerto in modo misolidio (Concerto in the Mixolydian mode) which is on a grand scale as to its duration and its content. Tozer’s Chandos recording runs to almost 41 minutes while Mustonen takes 36 or so. Even so that disc and its

There is also a Piano Concerto in A minor (1902) from his Russian years—you can hear it on Chandos CHAN9285 (with the Misolidio) with Geoffrey Tozer and on Naxos 8.553207 from Konstantin Scherbakov (with two other works for piano and orchestra: the Toccata and Fantasia Slava). As for the Misolidio itself there are other recordings: Tozer on Chandos CHAN9285 (with the A minor), Scherbakov on Naxos 8.553366 (with Concerto a cinque) and Sonya Hanke and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conducted by Myer Fredman on Marco Polo 8.220176 (with Three Preludes on Gregorian Themes). I have not heard these other discs.

The two concertos suffered through not attracting eminent enough soloists on the world stage. The Misolidio was premiered in New York on the last day of 1925 with Respighi as pianist and the NYPSO conducted by Mengelberg. The Misolidio has more drama in its DNA but it too feels the centrifugal pull of plainchant that carries all before it in Gregoriano. That medieval chant element is most strongly in evidence in the central movement. The concerto echoes Grieg at times, exults in language familiar from the Roman poems and in the exciting finale there are strands from Gershwin and Rachmaninov. There are even indications that Respighi had been impressed by De Falla’s Noches. The romping brass are a complete joy in that finale—sample the first couple of minutes and the hoarse stomping triumph at 2:32. The Fountains are well enough known. Suffice to say that Oramo gives the work its head in opulence and glowing Rosenkavalier delicacy.

The Ondine is at full price and the recording is superb whether roaring in manifold Straussian excess in the Fountains or in marginally more restrmore....

Review By Rob Barnett ,MusicWeb International,October 2010

Respighi’s fame now rests on his three Roman poems and the Rossini based suites. He in fact wrote concertos as well as a whole sequence of operas seemingly in aspiring competition with Puccini. The Concerto Gregoriano is his violin concerto. In it the soloist rather than being protagonist serves as hortator and cantor. It is a most lovely work whose melodies follow the undulating contours of Gregorian plainchant. Adversarial or dramatic it is not. For this aspect we need to look at the contrasting delights of the Concerto in modo misolidio (Concerto in the Mixolydian mode) which is on a grand scale as to its duration and its content. Tozer’s Chandos recording runs to almost 41 minutes while Mustonen takes 36 or so. Even so that disc and its

There is also a Piano Concerto in A minor (1902) from his Russian years—you can hear it on Chandos CHAN9285 (with the Misolidio) with Geoffrey Tozer and on Naxos 8.553207 from Konstantin Scherbakov (with two other works for piano and orchestra: the Toccata and Fantasia Slava). As for the Misolidio itself there are other recordings: Tozer on Chandos CHAN9285 (with the A minor), Scherbakov on Naxos 8.553366 (with Concerto a cinque) and Sonya Hanke and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conducted by Myer Fredman on Marco Polo 8.220176 (with Three Preludes on Gregorian Themes). I have not heard these other discs.

The two concertos suffered through not attracting eminent enough soloists on the world stage. The Misolidio was premiered in New York on the last day of 1925 with Respighi as pianist and the NYPSO conducted by Mengelberg. The Misolidio has more drama in its DNA but it too feels the centrifugal pull of plainchant that carries all before it in Gregoriano. That medieval chant element is most strongly in evidence in the central movement. The concerto echoes Grieg at times, exults in language familiar from the Roman poems and in the exciting finale there are strands from Gershwin and Rachmaninov. There are even indications that Respighi had been impressed by De Falla’s Noches. The romping brass are a complete joy in that finale—sample the first couple of minutes and the hoarse stomping triumph at 2:32. The Fountains are well enough known. Suffice to say that Oramo gives the work its head in opulence and glowing Rosenkavalier delicacy.

The Ondine is at full price and the recording is superb whether roaring in manifold Straussian excess in the Fountains or in marginally more restrmore....

Review By Rob Barnett ,MusicWeb International,October 2010

Respighi’s fame now rests on his three Roman poems and the Rossini based suites. He in fact wrote concertos as well as a whole sequence of operas seemingly in aspiring competition with Puccini. The Concerto Gregoriano is his violin concerto. In it the soloist rather than being protagonist serves as hortator and cantor. It is a most lovely work whose melodies follow the undulating contours of Gregorian plainchant. Adversarial or dramatic it is not. For this aspect we need to look at the contrasting delights of the Concerto in modo misolidio (Concerto in the Mixolydian mode) which is on a grand scale as to its duration and its content. Tozer’s Chandos recording runs to almost 41 minutes while Mustonen takes 36 or so. Even so that disc and its

There is also a Piano Concerto in A minor (1902) from his Russian years—you can hear it on Chandos CHAN9285 (with the Misolidio) with Geoffrey Tozer and on Naxos 8.553207 from Konstantin Scherbakov (with two other works for piano and orchestra: the Toccata and Fantasia Slava). As for the Misolidio itself there are other recordings: Tozer on Chandos CHAN9285 (with the A minor), Scherbakov on Naxos 8.553366 (with Concerto a cinque) and Sonya Hanke and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conducted by Myer Fredman on Marco Polo 8.220176 (with Three Preludes on Gregorian Themes). I have not heard these other discs.

The two concertos suffered through not attracting eminent enough soloists on the world stage. The Misolidio was premiered in New York on the last day of 1925 with Respighi as pianist and the NYPSO conducted by Mengelberg. The Misolidio has more drama in its DNA but it too feels the centrifugal pull of plainchant that carries all before it in Gregoriano. That medieval chant element is most strongly in evidence in the central movement. The concerto echoes Grieg at times, exults in language familiar from the Roman poems and in the exciting finale there are strands from Gershwin and Rachmaninov. There are even indications that Respighi had been impressed by De Falla’s Noches. The romping brass are a complete joy in that finale—sample the first couple of minutes and the hoarse stomping triumph at 2:32. The Fountains are well enough known. Suffice to say that Oramo gives the work its head in opulence and glowing Rosenkavalier delicacy.

The Ondine is at full price and the recording is superb whether roaring in manifold Straussian excess in the Fountains or in marginally more restrmore....

Review By Rob Barnett ,MusicWeb International,October 2010

Respighi’s fame now rests on his three Roman poems and the Rossini based suites. He in fact wrote concertos as well as a whole sequence of operas seemingly in aspiring competition with Puccini. The Concerto Gregoriano is his violin concerto. In it the soloist rather than being protagonist serves as hortator and cantor. It is a most lovely work whose melodies follow the undulating contours of Gregorian plainchant. Adversarial or dramatic it is not. For this aspect we need to look at the contrasting delights of the Concerto in modo misolidio (Concerto in the Mixolydian mode) which is on a grand scale as to its duration and its content. Tozer’s Chandos recording runs to almost 41 minutes while Mustonen takes 36 or so. Even so that disc and its

There is also a Piano Concerto in A minor (1902) from his Russian years—you can hear it on Chandos CHAN9285 (with the Misolidio) with Geoffrey Tozer and on Naxos 8.553207 from Konstantin Scherbakov (with two other works for piano and orchestra: the Toccata and Fantasia Slava). As for the Misolidio itself there are other recordings: Tozer on Chandos CHAN9285 (with the A minor), Scherbakov on Naxos 8.553366 (with Concerto a cinque) and Sonya Hanke and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra conducted by Myer Fredman on Marco Polo 8.220176 (with Three Preludes on Gregorian Themes). I have not heard these other discs.

The two concertos suffered through not attracting eminent enough soloists on the world stage. The Misolidio was premiered in New York on the last day of 1925 with Respighi as pianist and the NYPSO conducted by Mengelberg. The Misolidio has more drama in its DNA but it too feels the centrifugal pull of plainchant that carries all before it in Gregoriano. That medieval chant element is most strongly in evidence in the central movement. The concerto echoes Grieg at times, exults in language familiar from the Roman poems and in the exciting finale there are strands from Gershwin and Rachmaninov. There are even indications that Respighi had been impressed by De Falla’s Noches. The romping brass are a complete joy in that finale—sample the first couple of minutes and the hoarse stomping triumph at 2:32. The Fountains are well enough known. Suffice to say that Oramo gives the work its head in opulence and glowing Rosenkavalier delicacy.

The Ondine is at full price and the recording is superb whether roaring in manifold Straussian excess in the Fountains or in marginally more restrmore....

Read all publishers reviews(21)








 

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